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114: Growing Up

A Thousand Things to Talk About
114: Growing Up
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114-adulting

What do you see as “being an adult”?

Show notes and links:
AdultingBlog.com


Full episode text

Adulting, as a verb, is hard. Seriously. There’s so much to remember and do and inevitably we will all feel like we’ve failed. In talking with my own parents, they assure me that this imposter’s syndrome of adulthood is something that never really goes away, it can just be tamped down the more you deal with, well, people younger than you.

Which… well, frankly, kind of scares me. Being an adult means navigating a number of situations that are uncertain and new, and just as many that we never seem to be able to get quite right, despite our best efforts.

Which is why I absolutely adore the blog – and now the book – Adulting. The author, Kelly Williams Brown, carefully goes through advice on how to handle everything from doing email right to helping out friends that are currently sick There’s even suggestions that are, frankly, just good reminders. Things like don’t wash your hands with a long-sleeve coat on.

This blog was where I first found one of my favorite pieces of advice when it comes to language, ever. Step 213 – Do not comment on things people are, comment on things they do. It’s a scientifically supported, incredibly easy to forget, and incredibly powerful piece of advice that really makes me feel like an adult when I remember to do it.

Though I admit, I also adore the flowchart of how many drinks you can have at a work function, the advice about how to properly care for clothes (something I’m still working on), an “The proper response to a compliment is thank you.” Just thank you.

Adulting is work. Adulting is tough. And being an adult isn’t one particular thing, it’s a million little things – and admitting when you need help and advice is one of those things, in every situation in which you might have to be an adult.